S. Amal Hussnain, MD.

Specialties: 
Retinal Exams and Surgery
Biography: 

Dr. S. Amal Hussnain is a board-certified ophthalmologist. He is committed in providing the most advanced retina care in a highly personalized manner to his patients. In addition to performing surgery for macular holes, epiretinal membranes, retinal detachments, and intraocular lenses, Dr. Hussnain also treats medical disorders of the retina such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and vein occlusions. He sees patients in our Malta and Troy offices.

Dr. Hussnain graduated summa cum laude with B.Sc. in biochemistry from Union College, Schenectady, NY. While in college, he received cancer research training award and spent a year at the National Institutes of Health where he studied cancer stem cells. He then attended medical school at Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City, NY, where he was awarded the Edward Norton Prize in Ophthalmology upon graduation. He completed his ophthalmology residency training at Yale University Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences and was selected by the faculty to serve as the Chief Resident in his final year. During his residency at Yale, Dr. Hussnain received numerous awards including the Marvin Sears Award for Excellence in Clinical Ophthalmology, Academic Excellence Award, and Best Research Award. He then went on to complete a two-year Vitreous and Retina Surgery Fellowship at Columbia University, Vitreous Retina Macula Consultants of New York, Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, and New York University with some of the world-renowned leaders in the field of retina including Drs. Lawrence Yannuzzi and Stanley Chang.

Dr. Hussnain has presented at various national meetings, has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, and has contributed to medical textbooks. He is a member of American Academy of Ophthalmology, the American Society of Retina Specialists, and the Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology. His current research interests include ophthalmic imaging, age-related macular degeneration, and epiretinal membranes.